South Auckland teens bringing the taste of the Pacific to NZ with frozen 'Otai

A healthy twist on a much loved Polynesian drink is now on sale thanks to a group of teenagers from south Auckland.

Date
15.6.2018
15
.
6
Time
15:01:11
15:01:11
Location
Price
$
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Frotai is a frozen yoghurt version of 'Otai, a fruit drink traditionally from Tonga, and is made up of variations of watermelon, coconut milk, mango and pineapple.

Manurewa High School students Shrimal Sing, Summer Nanai, Louisa Dale and Christianya Seumanu formed a company called Kulture Splash and presented their frotai concept as part of the Lion Foundation Young Enterprise Scheme (YES) competition last week.

Chief executive Christianya Seumanu says food is one of the ways to share Pasifika culture which is why the group decided to go with 'Otai.

"By using frozen yoghurt it's a healthy alternative to ice cream," she says.

"We generally make it at home ourselves. You don't get it in supermarkets."

Using that monopoly to their advantage, the girls plan to sell the refreshing beverage at local markets and cultural shows, and eventually supermarkets.

To read the full article, click here.

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South Auckland teens bringing the taste of the Pacific to NZ with frozen 'Otai

A healthy twist on a much loved Polynesian drink is now on sale thanks to a group of teenagers from south Auckland.

Frotai is a frozen yoghurt version of 'Otai, a fruit drink traditionally from Tonga, and is made up of variations of watermelon, coconut milk, mango and pineapple.

Manurewa High School students Shrimal Sing, Summer Nanai, Louisa Dale and Christianya Seumanu formed a company called Kulture Splash and presented their frotai concept as part of the Lion Foundation Young Enterprise Scheme (YES) competition last week.

Chief executive Christianya Seumanu says food is one of the ways to share Pasifika culture which is why the group decided to go with 'Otai.

"By using frozen yoghurt it's a healthy alternative to ice cream," she says.

"We generally make it at home ourselves. You don't get it in supermarkets."

Using that monopoly to their advantage, the girls plan to sell the refreshing beverage at local markets and cultural shows, and eventually supermarkets.

To read the full article, click here.